By Gayle Gifford

Board member fundraising — what they need from you

Guess what development director. Board member fundraising is hard work.

Your board members aren’t going to start fundraising just because they are now on the board. And you can’t scold them into participating.

You’ve got to treat them as the individuals they are. If you invest time in these directors, some will become strong partners with you. Others may participate around the edges. With the proper attention, all will give.

Change happens in stages

Most of us don’t leap from never doing something to suddenly being good at it. We usually need to contemplate our new role, convincing ourselves that the benefits of doing the new thing are greater than the cons of doing it. Then we need to prepare, to develop the skills we need. With those skills, then we are ready to act, taking a small step forward into doing. After that it’s practice, practice, practice. And with the right supports to enable the new thing to eventually become second nature. .

What do board members need from you?

Above all, they need to really get the need for raising money. No, not the financial statement line item. The compelling case for support they can understand in their hearts, as well as their head.   How the money links to the outcomes. You can never explain this enough.

So show them. Create the transformative experience that knocks their socks off. A day volunteering in your food pantry?  That bird banding session with your super caring staff? A special trip to capitol hill?

Help them find the large donor in themselves. Have a relationship building strategy for each board member, just like you would have a strategy for any of your prospects.

What else do they need?

On the practical side:

  • The right assignment that corresponds to their planned movement up the change ladder
  • Leadership from you, the professional
  • A menu of options from a well-developed plan
  • Personal training, coaching, encouragement
  • Logistical support
  • Your gratitude for their work
  • Celebrating their baby steps and the big ones

And for yourself… when thinking about board member fundraising, start with the willing few. Then work your way deeper into the pack.

Volunteer fundraiser commitment

I was cleaning my workshop files and found this compact, or volunteer fundraiser commitment, I created a few years ago. Feel free to share.

Here’s my volunteer fundraiser commitment.

I will:

  • discover joy in raising money for my favorite cause
  • ask, otherwise I’ll never know
  • rely on my team for advice and support
  • only volunteer for assignments I know I can complete
  • ask for help when I need it, as soon as I need it.
  • take risks and not fear failing
  • remember the words of hockey star Wayne Gretzky: You  miss 100% of the shots you never take
  • send in my notes from all of my meetings and contacts

And, above all, I’ll remember that

  • I don’t have to be perfect, I just have to start!

More reading for you

12 common mistakes fundraisers make working with board members

If fundraising is a profession, why are we so angry with our amateur board members?

Aligning donor desires to your non-capital campaign

Heavy equiment for building thingsI was asked today by a client: Can we run fundraising for investments like staff that were identified in our strategic plan? Say a “non-capital campaign?”

Yes you can. Universities and hospitals do it all the time. Their big comprehensive campaigns usually include lots of stuff like buildings and equipment. But they also don’t overlook other capacity and operating needs, like new staff or programs.

To maximize success for a campaign like this, reframe the way you talk or think about donor motivation.

To get some help here, we’ve turned to the really smart folks at the Nonprofit Finance Fund. They frame the difference in terms that create a shared vocabulary for speakers of For-profit and Nonprofit English.

For the Nonprofit Finance Fund, build money (for “philanthropic equity”) is qualitatively different from buy money (for program execution). Builders invest in your enterprise capacity, not your services.They are more likely to be interested in enabling your growth with large gifts. They may only be providing you smaller annual donations because you haven’t piqued their true interests.

Buyers pay you to provide services to others. Buyers may be willing to contribute enough, if communicated well, to cover your other operating costs (too often considered “overhead” But that’s another article). But buyers don’t provide sufficient income above current costs to finance major new initiatives.

The takeaway: recognize, as the biggest nonprofits do, that you need institution-builders as well as buyers for your services and products. Read more

Before the scandal – 5 questions for your board

Taking a good look at someone else’s unfortunate sign of man diggingsituation before a scandal happens could head off a problem for your organization tomorrow.

Asking tough questions today can save deep trouble down the road.

Our local news has brought us more nonprofit scandals in the last few months – financial mismanagement, executive directors run
amok, programs ruined.

If this has happened in your area, consider this is an important learning moment for your board of directors. At your next board meeting, schedule some time to talk about the scandal and how vulnerable your organization might be to a situation like this.

Here are five questions to get your discussion started.

  1. What temptations led to this situation?
  2. Could this happen in our organization? How?
  3. What would our board have done in this situation?
  4. How can we prevent this from ever occurring here?
  5. How can we support and enable courageous questioning by our board members?

If you take our advice, we’d love to know how this conversation went for your board.

What other questions would you add to our list? Drop us an email.

For more on this topic, read

Employee theft – it can happen to you.

WHERE WAS THE BOARD? Too often, complicit

 

Community interviews: the benefits of doing them yourself

An essential part of any strategic plan or fundraising plan that we are working on are the community interviews.

There are benefits to doing community interviews yourself.

You don’t have to have your consultant do all of the community interviews. While our team is very proficient at interviewing, we still insist that our client’s  board and staff members conduct most of those conversations.

Why?

Here are a few of the benefits that I have seen:

  • These are your relationships, not mine. You need to strengthen those relationships, not me.
  • You can respond to opportunities or requests immediately… and you assume personal accountability to the asker. If I pass the request along, it’s too easy for you to ignore it.
  • Board members are often too myopic, wrapped in your organization’s bubble. A view from the outside is a nice breeze of fresh air.
  • For board members reluctant to talk to other people, structured questions are a safe way to exercise the schmooze muscle.
  • People tend to remember what they hear directly rather than what they read or heard in a report.
  • Community members or donors like to hear from board members, or our executive director, or even other staff members, depending on who they are.
  • There is a lot of wisdom out there you are likely missing if you don’t ask for it.

Read more

Yep, I’m an active visitor to cultural institutions.

Did you know that only 16% of US adults qualify as an active visitor to cultural institutions? To be an active visitor, you just have to visit something once every two years.

By this definition, a cultural institution is a museum, historic site, nature center, zoo, aquarium, ballet, botanical garden, theatre or science center.

This data and the other data in this post comes via the amazingly informative Colleen Dillenschneider and her great marketing analytics website KYOB. I’m obsessed with this data and share it as frequently as I can. That’s why I’m sharing it with you as you may find a lot of valuable information there even if you aren’t running a cultural institution.

I share a lot of the characteristics of these active visitors… though not all.

Unfortunately, the active visitor does not reflect the diversity of our country. And, active visitors are dying off or aging out of in greater numbers than they are being replaced. Are you on the staff or board of a cultural institution? This data is mandatory reading. Read more

Employee theft – it can happen to you.

Oh no! We've been robbed!

The July 2019 news brought another case of employee theft. The Executive Director, Controller and a business partner of the Boston Center for Adult Education have been charged with stealing $1.7 million over the last seven years. Time to share this advice. once again.

**********************************************************************

April 2014

Another news release about significant employee theft at a nonprofit rolled across my desk. A quick internet search on embezzlement at nonprofits turned up a myriad of cases. Time to talk to an expert in the field.

So I turned to Michael Santocki, Esq, First Vice President at Alliant Insurance Services (formerly  Crystal & Company) a “ leading strategic risk and insurance advisor.”

An attorney by trade, Michael has been in the insurance business for 20 years. We had a long discussion about many aspects of risk management at nonprofits, specifically in the area of employee theft.

GG: What can you tell me about employee theft at nonprofits?

MS: Employee theft is one of the most common areas of risk for nonprofits. Unfortunately, nonprofits don’t always have the level of controls that many private companies have.

According to a 2014 report by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners*, Nonprofits across the US lose approximately 5% of annual revenues to fraud.

GG: Could you tell me some of the ways this happens.

MS: Unfortunately, there are lots of ways this can happen.  Bookkeepers often create dummy invoices, ghost vendors or kickback schemes.

Take kickback schemes. In this case, an employee at the nonprofit works out a deal with the vendor. Let’s say the employee orders supplies, say 100 of some item. The vendor only ships 80 of that item and then kickbacks part of its profit to the employee on the 20 items that were not shipped. While the amount might be small, this type of theft adds up over time if it’s never caught.

Other types of employee theft are very innovative. For example, the office is being renovated so the employee slips in their own bills for renovation supplies for their own property.  An employee can prepare dummy invoices, where the check is written to themselves and then fudged later. This happened at Roman Catholic Diocese in NYC where a long-time, trusted employee in the accounting department, who was obsessed with purchasing expensive Madame Alexander dolls, was arrested in 2012 for embezzling more than $1 million over seven years.

GG: So what can an organization do to protect itself?

M.S. While criminal background checks are important, unfortunately, about 87%* of fraudsters have never been charged with a prior offense and that holds for both for profit and nonprofit organizations.

Nonprofit organizations need to be vigilant and take preventative measures to minimize the risk of theft or catch it early.

It is pretty hard to spot an executive director engaged in this type of activity. Never let one person be in charge of everything.

For example, make sure that you segregate duties for the folks paying bills and those handling money, have surprise audits, make sure that you have counter signatures on checks, and conduct fraud training for your employees.

Often the way many organizations catch the thief is to make the employee take vacation and then someone takes look at their work.

Know your employees. Keep an eye out when something seems out of line… be astute about suspected changes. Have a confidential hotline for employees to report suspicious activity within your organization.

GG: What if a theft happens anyway?

M.S. The good news is that an organization can transfer the risk by buying an insurance policy. For example, a crime insurance policy covers theft such as forgeries, alteration, counterfeit, burglary or robbery. Most mid-sized nonprofits could generally buy a policy for around $5000 for comprehensive coverage. A tiny organization could buy one for a few hundred dollars.

GG: Thank you Michael for opening my eyes to this uncomfortable world of employee theft. But both boards and executive directors need to be aware that not only can this happen, that it does with some regularity, even in our nonprofit sector. Be prepared.

*2014  Association of Certified Fraud Examiners: http://www.acfe.com/rttn/docs/2014-report-to-nations.pdf

 

Donor moment of insight: annual report lists

I am ever so thankful for a donor moment of insight.

When I’m working with a client on a strategic planning project, with their board and staff we routinely interview a selected group of stakeholders. They might be colleagues, political or government leaders, relevant businesses, funders, donors, volunteers … anyone with special insight. And it’s super great when two or more of those categories overlap.

A few days after a recent interview, I received a follow up email from a community leader-donor. They remembered something else they wanted me to share.

The donor had received the latest annual report. Like most of these reports, it included a list of donors. In this list, the organization had made a special effort to note donors who had given continuously.

Unfortunately, what was recognition for some was a rebuke for another. My donor felt hurt by not being included in this list. You see, this donor had been a donor for many long years. But, due to a few years of tight finances, there was a gap in their giving.

They were no less loyal. They started giving again when their finances improved. But that didn’t seem to matter. And now they were reconsidering future giving.

I completely sympathized. I feel this way whenever my college sends out its annual report with the same listing. Though I’ve been giving for many many years, I’ve missed a few now and then. Once I gave two gifts in the same fiscal year which knocked me out of the continuous recognition.

Think! What are you trying to accomplish with that public list of donors?

In this case, the intent was to reward some donors and inspire others to similar continuity. But it unexpectedly caused hurt feelings on the part of another long time donor.

Penelope Burk documents a number of concerns learned from donor research in her book Donor-Centered Fundraising. One that stands out are listings by gift range. A small donor might be making a huge stretch to give what they do. Yet they will never seem as valuable as those big donors for whom the gift that got them top recognition might be a drop in the bucket.

As the folks who care most about our donors, we’ll do better if we set aside convention and think of more creative ways to recognize and acknowledge our donors. The Audubon Society of Rhode Island’s complimentary membership is a good illustration of the return when you put donor needs first.

So, using that donor moment of insight shared above, here’s a simple solution:

 “Donor Since….”

 

Let’s talk about moral capital and recruiting your board

Just as I was getting ready to write this post about the need for more moral capital on your board, the higher education scandal broke in the US. Thirty-eight people taken into custody as of noon on March 12th in this bribery scheme.

It turns out that very wealthy folks from business and the media bribed administrators, coaches, test proctors and others to grease their kids into elite private colleges and universities. I guess their large direct donations weren’t enough?

Shamefully, this was done through Key Worldwide Foundation (KWF), a 501c3 public charity led by William “Rick” Singer who is pleading guilty to the charges against him.

According to its 2016 Form 990, KWF has just three directors: Singer as President and CEO, a Secretary, one other person. (The treasurer is not a director.) And, not only were the donors to KWF offering bribes for college placements, they were likely getting tax deductions for making those bribes through the nonprofit.

You need a philanthropic or moral compass in your organization — and most assuredly within the board. All your well-crafted bylaws, job descriptions, and list of expectations with references to ethics, the rule of law and conflict of interest won’t make up for directors or staff who lack a moral guiding light to do what is right.

People as capital

Talking about people as capital seems to be contrary to discussing your moral guiding light.

But I’ve previously pitched Professor Elizabeth Castillo and her typology of capitals. Using her list, you can begin valuing people beyond their own financial capital when you consider what you need in the way of the human capital you recruit to your board. This moves you beyond just recruiting directors who are wealthy donors and connectors to other money. It lets you value other assets that strengthen the board – e.g. intellectual, social, political, and cultural capital. And yes, moral capital.

And I don’t mean someone who can thread their way through the needle of what might or might not be ethical or legal. I want voices that are steadfast in defense of doing things the right way, with justice in their hearts, courageous enough to call out when something is bad, smells bad or just doesn’t feel right.

Unless our sector stands strong for honesty, truth and transparency, we risk the public’s trust — which has been on a downward slide for many years.

How much moral capital sits on your board?

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